Vegetation Ecology Lab / 植群生態研究室

Institute of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, National Taiwan University

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cloud_wind:start [2020/08/11 08:51]
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cloud_wind:start [2020/08/11 09:08]
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 ===== Taxonomic and functional diversity and geographical distribution of the Subtropical Montane Cloud Forest in Taiwan: A multiscale approach ===== ===== Taxonomic and functional diversity and geographical distribution of the Subtropical Montane Cloud Forest in Taiwan: A multiscale approach =====
 //Ministry of Science and Technology, 109-2621-B-002-002-MY3; duration: 2020/08/01-2023/07/31// //Ministry of Science and Technology, 109-2621-B-002-002-MY3; duration: 2020/08/01-2023/07/31//
-[{{ :figures:fishey_cloud_yy_lake.jpg?direct&400|Fisheye photograph of cloud forest in Yuan Yang Lake (鴛鴦湖). Photo: D. Zelený, 2014.}}]+ 
 +{{ ::woody_chamaecyparis.jpg?direct&400|}}
 Mountain cloud forests worldwide belong to one of the most peculiar and at the same time one of the most endangered forest ecosystems. Frequent fog causes high air humidity and horizontal precipitations, which in turn also decrease air temperature, solar radiation and decomposition rate, resulting in a combination of the humid, dark and nutrient-limited environmental conditions. In Taiwan, around 48,000 ha of Subtropical Montane Cloud Forest (SMCF) still occurs in elevations between 1500–2500 m a.s.l. The main threat to cloud forests worldwide and also in Taiwan are land-use changes, mainly converting the forest into agricultural land or into forestry plantations, and anthropogenic climate change, which is likely to result in vertical uplift of the cloud base, directly affecting the habitats of cloud forests in lower elevations by drought. Since cloud forests provide important ecosystem services (e.g. availability of drinkable water for downstream regions), detailed understanding of the relationship between vegetation and environment is necessary for designing effective conservation and management strategies to protect their habitats. Mountain cloud forests worldwide belong to one of the most peculiar and at the same time one of the most endangered forest ecosystems. Frequent fog causes high air humidity and horizontal precipitations, which in turn also decrease air temperature, solar radiation and decomposition rate, resulting in a combination of the humid, dark and nutrient-limited environmental conditions. In Taiwan, around 48,000 ha of Subtropical Montane Cloud Forest (SMCF) still occurs in elevations between 1500–2500 m a.s.l. The main threat to cloud forests worldwide and also in Taiwan are land-use changes, mainly converting the forest into agricultural land or into forestry plantations, and anthropogenic climate change, which is likely to result in vertical uplift of the cloud base, directly affecting the habitats of cloud forests in lower elevations by drought. Since cloud forests provide important ecosystem services (e.g. availability of drinkable water for downstream regions), detailed understanding of the relationship between vegetation and environment is necessary for designing effective conservation and management strategies to protect their habitats.