Vegetation Ecology Lab / 植群生態研究室

Institute of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, National Taiwan University

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projects [2018/01/28 14:23]
david [Changes in species- and community-level properties of forest vegetation along cloud and chronic-wind gradients in Taiwan]
projects [2018/03/12 12:54] (current)
david
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 ===== Changes in species- and community-level properties of forest vegetation along cloud and chronic-wind gradients in Taiwan ===== ===== Changes in species- and community-level properties of forest vegetation along cloud and chronic-wind gradients in Taiwan =====
 <fs small>​Ministry of Science and Technology, 106-2621-B-002-003-MY3;​ duration: 2017/​08/​01-2020/​07/​31</​fs>​ <fs small>​Ministry of Science and Technology, 106-2621-B-002-003-MY3;​ duration: 2017/​08/​01-2020/​07/​31</​fs>​
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 +[ [[cloud_wind:​start|link to the project website]] ]
  
 Taiwan as a subtropical island exposed to East-Asian monsoon system offers a unique opportunity to study vegetation along two peculiar stress gradients, cloud frequency and chronic-wind intensity. Frequent cloud or persistent strong winds have remarkable ecological effects on vegetation and require specific species adaptations. Cloud and monsoon forests thus represent unique vegetation types, hosting a number of endemic and relict species. In the near future, ongoing climate change is expected to modify both cloud frequency and chronic-wind intensity. To understand the impact of these changes on future diversity and species composition of cloud and monsoon forests and the ecological mechanisms behind has therefore not only high theoretical values, but also practical importance in conservation. Taiwan as a subtropical island exposed to East-Asian monsoon system offers a unique opportunity to study vegetation along two peculiar stress gradients, cloud frequency and chronic-wind intensity. Frequent cloud or persistent strong winds have remarkable ecological effects on vegetation and require specific species adaptations. Cloud and monsoon forests thus represent unique vegetation types, hosting a number of endemic and relict species. In the near future, ongoing climate change is expected to modify both cloud frequency and chronic-wind intensity. To understand the impact of these changes on future diversity and species composition of cloud and monsoon forests and the ecological mechanisms behind has therefore not only high theoretical values, but also practical importance in conservation.